Lifestyles 55 Articles

Ian Leatt
Foodies

Pastry, in particular cakes, has always been a passion of mine. What can I say about chocolate that hasn’t already been said? Chocolate is a healthy food, great for our heart in more than a romantic way. It was once thought to have aphrodisiac qualities. Chocolate is great for cleaning our blood vessels. We need a high rate of blood pumping throughout our body when we exercise or make love, so we are doing our hearts a service when we help ourselves to some chocolate.

Chocolate tastes great and is prepared in multiple forms so it’s hard to imagine how any person could fail to find a taste and texture that appeals to them.

“All changes, even the most longed for, have their melancholy; for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves.”

– French novelist Anatole France


Krystal Stokes
Healthy Living

Why do people resist change? Is it because we are habitual creatures, craving the comfort of what we know versus the discomfort of what we don’t? When faced with an impending change or even the possibility of change, some of us stubbornly dig in our heels and resist. And if that resistance involves someone you love, perhaps an aging parent who won’t accept any help, how can you successfully transition from the old to the new?

Does seasonal affective disorder affect seniors more than the general population?

Myrna Driedger
Broadway Journal

As we move into the depths of winter, we are more than halfway through our winter season. January always seems to be the hardest month to get through – low temperatures, blizzards and the winter doldrums are experienced by everyone, especially those who are not able to get away to a warmer climate. But by the time February rolls around, we are starting to notice that the days are getting longer, and we feel hopeful that spring may not be too far off.

“Now is the accepted time to make your regular annual good resolutions. Next week you can begin paving hell with them as usual.”

- Mark Twain


Krystal Stokes
Healthy Living

January is often a time for personal reflection, as a new year can gently nudge people in the direction of change. Survey results compiled by the Toronto Star a few years back found that 68 per cent of Canadians make New Year’s resolutions. The top three resolutions were the ubiquitous “lose weight”, followed closely by “quit smoking” and “stick to a budget”. Even though less than 20 per cent of people will make it a full year committed to that resolution, many of us continue to make them anyway. So why do we put ourselves on the resolution roller coaster year after year? And is there a key to success?

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